World’s Most Expensive Rolls-Royce Gets a Wooden Replica When A Dad Builds One For His Son - Bliteoc

World’s Most Expensive Rolls-Royce Gets a Wooden Replica When A Dad Builds One For His Son

3 months ago 48

A Rolls-Royce is costly – extremely expensive – and the Rolls-Royce Boat Tail is the most expensive car in the world, costing a cool $28 million, surpassing the Bugatti La Voiture Noir as the most expensive new car today.

How did the creators of the notorious Flying Spur insignia do this? The Boat Tail became the most wanted ultra-luxury vehicle in the world after its debut at the Concorso d’Eleganza Vill d’Este, with superstars like Beyoncé and Jay-Z owning one. It is totally customised, with the client having complete control over every option accessible on the vehicle.

They don’t skimp on the details, so there’s no hard plastic alternative here if you want to construct your own boat tail. To give you an idea of how unique this Rolls Royce is, you’ll find a fully personalized aluminum Mont Blanc pen with a leather case in the glovebox. Every Boat Tail will be an oceanic blue color with sparkling crystals throughout. If you choose to purchase this luxury for yourself, you will also receive matching personalized cutlery and plates.

The nautically themed vehicle, perhaps one of Britain’s most outstanding achievements, motivated one father, a carpentry expert, to make a copy of the four-seater for his son. On a smaller scale, talk about coach building!

This isn’t going to be easy. The designers of the original, full-scale version of the vehicle took inspiration and influence from the original 1932 Boat Tail model, as well as the shapes and functionality of racing yachts, to give you an idea of how tough it is to capture that boat-like design.

“The coachbuild represents persons of exceptional ability, culture, and the desire to create an absolutely unique automobile.”

That appears to be a challenging task; will daddy be able to do it? Yes, he can, and there’s a video to prove it.

Watch as this father-of-the-year builds a Rolls-Royce Boat Tail for his kid in just 68 days.

ND – Woodworking Art, a Youtube user, demonstrates to the world that he, too, possesses the expertise and master touch of the world’s top designers, engineers, and artisans by building a smaller scale Rolls Royce Boat Tail model with his two bare hands.

When another youngster was strutting around in a white Rolls-Royce Cullinan look-alike, he began filming his son’s reaction. Accepting the challenge, the father begins filming his kid chopping wood and designing a vehicle that he will be pleased to drive.

The 16-minute film documented everything from molding slabs of wood to fitting axles and mechanical elements to move the Rolls-Royce replica, which took 68 days to complete.

The car is assembled with ND- Woodworking Art’s creative touches, and it can seat two at the same time – far better than other motorized miniature cars on the market, which can only hold a maximum of two toddlers at a time.

The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail imitation included much of the bells and whistles of the actual Boat Tail, except for the two-tone blue paint job, which was driven by a simple chain. That’s one happy kid, with suicide-reverse opening doors, functional lights, matching interior/exterior, and the Flying Spur!

That isn’t the only feature that this father designed for his son. When you walk to the back (which is addressed later in the movie), you’ll notice that the car not only drives well, but it also has features that give it its name: the tailgate. The boot opens up in the movie to show a yacht-style deck, just like the real Rolls Royce Boat Tail, which is brimming with delicacies fit for a Sunday picnic!

Though the Rolls-Royce Boat Tail is a one-of-a-kind project (so far), ND – Woodworking Art is no stranger to duplicating vehicle marvels, having recently constructed his son a Lamborghini Sian Roadster.

I mean, who wouldn’t want a father like him?

Let’s hope that ND – Woodworking Art will produce more projects in the future, based on the quality of their work.

Source & Credit: keeponmind.com

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